The Scheer Family: All In

Scheer FamilyIn July of 2013, Cory Scheer was in a life-threatening bike accident. Miraculously, he walked out of the hospital 2 days later, but, as you might expect, his life was never the same.

That same year, Cory started on a journey of running 12 marathons in 12 months, calling it “The Basic Needs Marathon Challenge,” raising money for 5 different charities over the course of the year. His incredible story—and his commitment to helping others through the telling of it—landed him a finalist spot in a Runner’s World Cover Contest in 2014.

That’s when Cory met Rusty, a Team World Vision staff person and fellow Runner’s World finalist. Passionate about helping meet the basic needs of children through running, Team World Vision became a perfect fit for Cory. The problem was, Team World Vision didn’t have an event in Cory’s hometown of Kansas City, Missouri. So Cory, with crucial encouragement and involvement from his family, helped change that.

Cory ScheerIn 2015, Cory and his wife, Jamie, volunteered to co-captain a team from their church–Pleasant Valley Baptist Church–and run the Kansas City Marathon and Half Marathon. In the first year, they had a goal of getting 100 people from KC to run and raise $100,000. Well, as Cory said, “For us, Team World Vision has been about continual exceeding of expectations. We think we’ve accomplished something, but then God does more.” In their first year, the KC team was almost 300 runners strong and raised $210,000. 

“Jamie has been an incredible volunteer,” says Cory. She is a physical and nutritional therapist and has helped lots of her teammates as they’ve trained for the race. “This has not just been about one person, we’ve truly had a co-captain model,” said Cory.

Scheer kidsAnd they haven’t stopped there. Cory and Jamie’s kids—Cailyn (13), Isaac (11), Evan (5), and Levi (5)—have been clean water advocates as well. The kids are always at group runs cheering people on, have volunteered at the World Vision 6K for Water, and even organized fundraisers for clean water at their school. “It’s important to us that any time we can model a life of generosity, we do it. And the only way our kids can learn that is to be involved and participate,” Cory says. 

This year, the Scheers are at it again. They are key volunteer leaders in Kansas City, spreading the word about how to run for clean water with Team World Vision. There are already over 600 people signed up for the Kansas City Marathon in October (2 of which are Cory and Jamie of course). 

As Cory reflected recently on the 3-year anniversary of his accident, he wrote: “By God’s grace and His grace alone, the “tragedy” has been transformed into a new trajectory. My family’s entire frame of reference has moved further away from entitlement and more towards gratitude. Had I not gone through this experience, I may have never connected with Team World Vision, an organization mobilizing thousands of people to raise millions of dollars to end the water crisis in Africa. The work of providing clean water goes on. We each have an opportunity, by God’s grace and grace alone, to create a new trajectory for those living in tragic circumstances.”

Thank you, Scheer Family, for your incredibly generous commitment of time, resources, and influence in order to help create a better world for children in need. You ALL have played an essential role in bringing Team World Vision to a new city, and with you, we stand in awe of the work God is doing as a result of your willingness to serve. Thank you for your leadership in Kansas City and beyond. 

 

Johgina Densmore: Creating “Aha Moments”

JohginaWhen Johgina Densmore heard about the World Vision 6K for Water in 2014, she had never run a race in her life. But when she read that the registration fee provided clean water to a child, it was a no-brainer. “I can’t even wrap my mind around the fact that there are places in the world that don’t have clean water.” So she took the plunge.

Johgina describes her very first race like this: “Crossing the finish line really was euphoric. I was 49 at the time and crossing the finish line was something I never thought I would be able to do. And the bigger impact for me was that this was really going to help somebody. I thought to myself, I’ve never done this before. But some kid has to do this every day. Some mother has to do this. So that helped me know I could get through it.” 

From that point on, Johgina talked about the 6K to all of her friends and coworkers and the next year brought a team of 15 people to the race.

While picking up their race bibs, Johgina’s friend started to cry. After the race, she told Johgina, “Thank you so much for inviting me. I didn’t even know.” And Johgina realized that one of the best parts of the 6K was seeing her friends be exposed to needs in other parts of the world. “I get to say, ‘Let me tell you what you can do to make a huge impact,’ and it becomes an aha moment for them. It’s the bib that matters.”

Johgina's Team“My personal mission statement is to help people grow,” said Johgina. “If I’m training leaders at work or at church, I talk about the value of people. So I think the same way with the 6K. It is about the value of life and the value of children.

This year Johgina took it to the next level again and invited her whole church—Apostolic Faith Church in Chicago—to participate. They are aiming for a team of 200! And all because Johgina went to her pastor and said, “If I can do it, anyone can do it. The cause is amazing—that a small registration can really make an impact on children.” 

Thank you, Johgina, for creating “aha moments” and being a passionate advocate for children in need of clean water!

If you’d like to join Johgina at the 6K for Water in Chicago this summer, register here! You can also do it in the Twin Cities or Northwest Indiana